Wednesday, December 23, 2015

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Sunday, November 22, 2015

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Sunday, September 20, 2015

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Thursday, May 7, 2015

Award-Winning Book - Triggers: Creating Behavior That Lasts - Becoming the Person You Want to Be – Reviewer Professor M.S.Rao









"Triggers provides the self awareness you need to create your own world, rather than being created by the world around you." —Alan Mulally, CEO of the Year (US) and #3 on Fortune magazine's 50 Greatest Leaders in the World (2014)


What are the Details of the Book?

If you intend to improve your behavior and reduce regrets in your life, read this book. If you want to align and integrate your internal and external environment, read this book.  If you want to unlock your potential to grow as a professional and leader, read this book. Marshall Goldsmith and Mark Reiter’s authored book Triggers: Creating Behavior That Lasts--Becoming the Person You Want to Be is divided into four parts and 22 chapters examining the environmental and psychological triggers that can derail us at work and in life.


What is Inside?

In this book, Marshall Goldsmith shows how we can overcome the trigger points in our lives, and enact meaningful and lasting change. It unveils that change, no matter how urgent and clear the need, is hard. Knowing what to do does not ensure that we will actually do it. We are superior planners but become inferior doers as our environment exerts its influence through the course of our day. We forget our intentions. We become tired, even depleted, and allow our discipline to drain down like water in a leaky bucket. Marshall offers a simple “magic bullet” solution in the form of daily self-monitoring, hinging around what he calls “active” questions. These are questions that measure our effort, not our results. There’s a difference between achieving and trying; we can’t always achieve a desired result, but anyone can try. In the course of Triggers, Goldsmith details the six “engaging questions” that can help us take responsibility for our efforts to improve and help us recognize when we fall short.  It outlines that there are several distinctions that improve our understanding of how triggers influence our behavior.
  1. A behavioral trigger can be direct or indirect.
  2. A trigger can be internal or external.
  3. A trigger can be conscious or unconscious.
  4. A trigger can be anticipated or unexpected.
  5. A trigger can be encouraging or discouraging.
  6. A trigger can be productive or counterproductive.

Marshall Goldsmith shares his experience with Alan Mulally as follows: Of all coaching clients, the executive who improved the most while spending the least amount of time with me was Alan Mulally. And he was a fantastic leader to start with.

I first met Alan in 2001, when he was president of Boeing Commercial Aircraft, before he became the CEO of Ford Motor Company in 2006. When Alan retired from Ford in 2014, Fortune magazine ranked him as the third-greatest leader in the world, behind Pope Francis and Angela Merkel. He and I are now working together to help both nonprofits and major companies develop great leadership teams.

Alan doesn’t merely believe in the value of structure; he lives it and breathes it. When Alan arrived at Ford he instituted weekly Thursday morning meetings, known as the Business Plan Review, or BPR, with his sixteen top executives and the executive’s guests from a around the world.

Alan, who had spent his entire career building jet airplanes, had an aeronautical engineer’s faith in structure and process. To get talented people working together, he paid attention to details, all the way down to the granular level. He began each BPR session in the same way: “My name is Alan Mulally and I’m the CEO of Ford Motor Company.” Then he’d review the company’s plan, status, forecast and areas that needed special attention, using a green-yellow-red scoring system for good-concerned-poor. He asked his top sixteen executives to do the same, using the same introductory language and color scheme. In effect, he was using the same type of structure that Marshall recommends in his coaching process and applying it to the entire corporation. Alan was introducing structure to his new team. And he did not deviate, either in content or wording. He always identified himself, always listed his four priorities, always graded his performance for previous week. He never went off-message, and he expected the executives to follow suit.

Most executives quickly signed on. But a couple rebelled. Alan patiently explained that this was the way he’d chosen to run the meeting. He wasn’t forcing the rebellious ones to follow his lead. “If you don’t want to,” he told them, “that’s your choice. It doesn’t make you a bad person. It just means you can’t be part of the team.” No yelling, no threats, no histrionics.

Alan’s first days at Ford are a testament to how willfully-and predictably-people resist change.  This was the same Ford leadership team responsible for posting a record $12.7 billion loss the year Alan arrived, the same team asking the new CEO to go hat in hand to bankers in New York and borrow $23 billion to keep Ford operating. If any group was ready for a change, it was Alan’s team. Yet even with their jobs on the line, two of the executives were refusing to change their behavior in the BPR. It wasn’t long before these two resisters decided to become former Ford executives.

Marshall praises Frances Hesselbein’s commitment as follows: I’ve already established my admiration for Frances Hesselbein. But one moment in her career sticks out above everything else as behavior worth modeling:
A few years ago, Frances got an invitation to the White House. The White House date conflicted with her commitment to speak to a small nonprofit group in Denver. To most people this wouldn’t be a conundrum: A meeting with the president of the United States or an unpaid speech in Denver? We call the folks in Denver, explain the situation, offer to reschedule or promise to come back the next year. After all, it’s a pro bono. We’re doing the folks in Denver a favor. They’ll understand.

Frances went the other way. She told the White House she wouldn’t be attending. “I have a commitment,” she said. “They’re expecting me.” (The real kicker for me, the cherry on top of this integrity sundae: Frances never told the Denver group about the White House invitation.)


Leadership Takeaways
  • Change doesn’t happen overnight. Success is the sum of small efforts repeated day in and day out. If we make the effort, we will get better. If we don’t, we won’t. Commitment. Motivation. Self-discipline. Self-control. Patience. Those are powerful allies when we try to change our ways.
  • Regret is the emotion we experience when we assess our present circumstances and reconsider how we got here. We replay what we actually did against what we should have done-and find ourselves wanting in some way. Regret can hurt.
  • Meaningful behavioral change is very hard to do. And no one can make us change unless we truly want to change.
  • Even when we’re aware of our environment and welcome being in it, we become victims of its ruthless power.
  • If we do not create and control our environment, our environment creates and controls us. And the result turns us into someone who don’t recognize.
  • A feedback loop comprises four stages: evidence, relevance, consequence, and action.
  • A behavioral trigger is any stimulus that impacts our behavior.
  • Apology is where behavioral change begins.
  • Intrinsic motivation is wanting to do something for its own sake, because we enjoy it; for example, reading a book that isn’t assigned in class, simply because we’re curious about the subject. People who get up early to run six miles for the pure pleasure of physical exertion are high in intrinsic motivation for that particular activity.  Extrinsic motivation is doing something for external rewards such as other people’s approval or to avoid punishment. We are bombarded with extrinsic motivators during our school years-grades, awards, scholarships, parental pressure, resume building acceptance into prestige schools. 
  • The social psychologist Roy F. Baumeister coined the term ego depletion in the 1990s. He contended that we possess a limited conceptual resource called ego strength, which is depleted through the day by our various efforts at self-regulation-resisting temptations, making trade-offs, inhibiting our desires, controlling our thoughts and statements, adhering to other people’s rules. People in this state, said Baumeister, are ego depleted.
  • We also underestimate how the quality of our goals affects our motivation. We fail at New Year’s resolutions because our goals are almost always about marginal stuff, which we pursue with marginal motivation. Instead of aiming at core issues-say, escaping a hateful job-we aim for vague, amorphous targets like “take a class” or “travel more.” A marginal goal begets marginal effort.
  • If your motivation for a task or goal is in any way compromised-because you lack the skill, or don’t take the task seriously, or think what you’ve done so far is good enough-don’t take it on. Find something else to show the world how much you care, not how little.
  • Pro bono is an adjective, not an excuse. If you think doing folks a favor justifies doing less than your best, you’re not doing anyone any favors. Including yourself. People forget your promise, remember your performance. It’s like a restaurant donating food to a homeless shelter, but delivering shelf dated leftovers and scraps that hungry people can barely swallow. The restaurant owner thinks he’s being generous, that any donation is better than nothing. Better than nothing is not even close to good enough – and good enough, after we make a promise, is never good enough.
  • A professional shoots for the highest standards. An amateur settles for good enough. We are professionals at what we do, amateurs at what we want to become. We need to erase this devious distinction-or at least close the gap between professional and amateur-to become the person we want to be. Being good over hero does not excuse being not so good over there.
  • When we engage in noncompliance, we’re not just being sloppy and lazy. It’s more aggressive and rude than that. We’re thumbing our noses at the world, announcing, “The rules don’t apply to us. Don’t rely on us.  We don’t care.” We’re drawing a line at good enough and refusing to budge beyond it.
  • Never wrestle with a pig-because you both get dirty but the pig love it.

Marshall unfurls that we mostly suffer a failure of imagination. Until a few years ago, he had never coached an executive who was also a medical doctor. He had the privilege of coaching three: Dr. Jim Yong Kim, the president of the World Bank; Dr. John Noseworthy, the president of the Mayo Clinic; and Dr. Raj Shah, the administrator of the United States Agency for International Development. Along with being brilliant, they are three of the most dedicated, high-integrity people I have ever met.


What is the Recommendation?

This book equips you with self-awareness and brings out behavioral changes to become a better professional and leader.  It contains powerful one liners, quotes and diagrams. The biggest take away from this book is ‘Invest in your future’.  Marshall shares his professional experiences with great CEOs including Alan Mulally. He appreciates Frances Hesselbein’s commitment.  He collects his fee at the end of the period. No results, no fee.  It is obvious that Marshall is not after money. He is after sharing his knowledge and making a difference to the world.  I congratulate Marshall for writing such an inspiring book to bring behavioral improvement in leaders.

This book covers content better than Marshall’s bestselling books, Mojo and What Got You Here Won’t Get You There. If you have not read Marshall Goldsmith’s book, it means you don’t know much about leadership and coaching. It is a must read for every leader on the earth to become a better professional and leader. I am a reviewer of various international journals including Human Resources Management International Digest, Emerald, UK. I read thousands of books in my life but I can proudly say that it is one of the top ten books I have read in my lifetime.

It is a book on behavioral coaching and the title ‘Triggers’ is truly amazing.  It is written in a conversational tone.  The ideas and insights in this book are well punched.  This book is useful for learners, leaders, coaches and CEOs.  You can gift this book to your friends and they will thank you forever for your kind gesture. Strongly recommended reading this book! 


"Triggers inspires us to be better people, better leaders, better fellow travelers.’ Creatingg behavior' is our new battle cry for a bright future." —Frances Hesselbein, President and CEO, The Frances Hesselbein Leadership Institute, 1998 Presidential Medal of Freedom Award Recipient

References
Triggers: Creating Behavior That Lasts--Becoming the Person You Want to Be by Marshall Goldsmith and Mark Reiter (Crown Business, May 19, 2015)


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Life is great!

Professor M.S.Rao, India
Founder of MSR Leadership Consultants India
Listed in Marquis Who's Who in the World in 2013
21 Success Sutras for Leaders: Top 10 Leadership Books of the Year (San Diego University) Amazon URL: http://www.amazon.com/21-Success-Sutras-Leaders-ebook/dp/B00AK98ELI


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Saturday, April 4, 2015

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Tuesday, March 17, 2015

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Award-Winning Book - The Eight Competencies of Relationship Selling: How to Reach the Top 1% in Just 15 Extra Minutes a Day










“When two people want to do business together, the details won’t keep them apart. But if two people do not want to do business together, the details will not confirm the deal.” - Dr. Tony Alessandra


What are the Details of the Book?

If you want to acquire knowledge on presentation skills and negotiations skills, read this book. If you want to acquire selling tools and techniques to excel as a successful sales professional, read this book. If you want to grow as a great speaker and presenter, read this book. Jim Cathcart’s authored book The Eight Competencies of Relationship Selling: How to Reach the Top 1% in Just 15 Extra Minutes a Day gives you the simple essential skills for your self-directed performance improvement.


What is Inside?

The book outlines ten keys to active listening as follows: resist distractions; take notes; let people tell their story; offer verbal feedback; listen selectively; relax; listen with your entire body; be aware of personal space; ask questions; and show that you care about what they’re saying.

The book outlines fifteen ways to stay close to customers as follows: show them that you think about them; drop by to show them what’s new; follow up a sale with a free gift to enhance the purchase; offer valued customer discounts; let customers know they should contact you when they hire employees; compensate your customers whenever they lose time or money; be personal; always be honest; accept returns unconditionally; honor your customer’s privacy; keep your promises; give feedback whenever you get referrals; make your customers famous; arrange periodic performance reviews; and keep the lines of communication open.  It outlines some tips that will make you more effective and make your speech more powerful.
1.    Know your audience.
2.    Know your stuff. In other words, get your material together. Know what it is you’re going to talk about. Know what key points you’re going to make. Make no more than three to five key points. Illustrate each one with a good story or state some facts. Provide a demonstration or a visual to drive that point home and then summarize it.
3.    Create a catchy title for your own presentation.
4.    Do your homework. Research company records, the library, magazines, telephone interviews, websites, whatever is necessary to bring interesting and vital current information to your speech.
5.    Stick with your outline.
6.    Introduce the subject you’re going to talk about.
7.    Concentrate mainly on your introduction and conclusion.
8.    Plan a question-and-answer period at the end.  
9.    Rehearse regularly for your speech.
10. Stay on time.
11. Show up early. Make sure all the systems are a go. Be extra sure there is plenty of light on you the speaker.
12. Vary your eye contact during your speech. While you’re presenting, don’t just speak to one group of people; speak to the entire audience. Move around during your speech. But make sure you don’t move so much that you’re distracting the audience. Have a purpose to the movement.
13. Finally, hang in there.
Here is what the author has discovered, in his twenty-five years of professional speaking to over 2,400 organizations around the world, about “one percenters” and the characteristics they possess. One percenters:
·         Think differently about what they do. (They are building, not just doing.)
·         Build relationships in advance of needing them.
·         Take personal responsibility for making things happen.
·         Intelligently work the odds.
·         Intentionally form habits and cultivate patterns that work.
·         Know the payoffs of each of their activities.
·         Are impatient with those who don’t take charge of their own lives and careers.
·         Are generous with their time and resources toward worthy recipients.
Here is a quick formula for generating abundant sales right away without compromising your reputation, profitability, or long-term goals: notice more; cover the gaps; increase human contact; begin a series of chain reactions; keep the ball in your court; maximize your leverage; and think beyond today.
The author shares an anecdote with Bill Clinton as follows: In 1994 he had the opportunity to visit the White House with a small group of professional speakers. At the end of the tour while their group was standing in the foyer, Jim’s wife, Paula, suddenly said, “Oh my gosh, here he come.”
They looked across the room and sure enough, there came the President of the United States. At that time it was Bill Clinton. He walked over and he spent about ten minutes with our group, one-on-one, chatting with each of us. Someone in the group mentioned that they were professional speakers and commented that President Clinton, too, was in many ways a professional speaker. Clinton looked directly at Jim and said, “Half of my job is keeping people in the right frame of mind.”

Dr. Tony Alessandra, author of The Platinum Rule and Four Personality Types
Author’s friend, Dr. Tony Alessandra, author of The Platinum Rule, says that we should practice the Platinum Rule: “Do unto others as they would like to be done unto.”  It’s a play on the Golden Rule, treat other people the way they would like to be treated. Many years ago, Tony and I worked together as partners in the creation of a program called “Relationship Strategies.” Relationship Strategies” was based on understanding different types of people, and relating to them using different strategies, based on what kind of person they were.
There are two dimensions to this. One is openness. With any person you meet, it’s pretty easy to determine whether they’re being open or not. Someone who is not open we call “guarded.” They tend to keep things close to the vest, not show their feelings. There are more thinking-oriented. They tend to be a little bit more fact-focused, more formal and proper. People who are guarded tend not to share information readily.
Someone who’s open and direct is called the socializer. The socializer is the outgoing individual who will tell you what they’re thinking at any given moment. You can read them like a book.
The open person who’s indirect, slower paced, we call the relater. The relater is someone who’s a people person, a team player, more soft and easygoing about things.
The indirect person who is guarded is what, I call the thinker. The thinker is someone who is more task-oriented. They’re someone who will analyze and take time to study the details before making a decision.
The guarded person who is direct is a fast-paced person that we call the director. The director is a person who gets right to the point. They want something done, they want it done right and they want it done now. They are very assertive people.
So there are four modes – the director, the socializer, the relater, and the thinker – four types of people. When you learn to recognize these four types – you’ll be more effective in selling, because each type requires a different approach to reduce the tension with them and increase the cooperation to generate more sales.
Notice the kind of person you’re dealing with so you can practice Tony’s Platinum Rule: “Do unto them the way they would want to ne done unto.”
The relaters strengths are listening, teamwork, and follow through. Their weaknesses are that they are a little overly sensitive; sometimes slow to start, they tend not to set very big goals.
The thinkers are guarded and indirect. They are slow and systematic, their priority is on the task, their focus is on the process, and their appearance is a little more formal or a little more reserved. Their strengths are planning and organization. Their weaknesses tend to perfectionism, a bit hypercritical, slow to make decision.
The director is someone who is guarded but direct. They’re fast and decisive, they focus on the task, and they want to get results. They are businesslike and powerful. Their workplace is busy, efficient, and structured. Their internal motivation is winning, being in charge. Strengths are delegating, leadership, inspiring others. Weaknesses are impatient, insensitive, they dislike details. They are irritated by inefficiency and indecision. It drives them nuts. Under stress they get highly critical and become dictatorial. Their decisions are decisive and quick and they seek from you bottom-line results.
Finally, there is the socializer. What they fear is loss of prestige or boredom. They measure their personal worth by recognition they’ve achieved, status, the number of friends, the kind of attention they’re drawing to themselves.

High, Medium and Low Velocity: The modern society tends to reward the people with higher velocity. High velocity-those who are genuinely self-motivated, who love to work toward goals. They prefer long hours, they like those hours filled with a variety of activity. They use even, their leisure time to advance toward their goals. In moderate velocity, people prefer a standard work day with a moderate mix of activities.  In low velocity, people are motivated primarily by others, or by needs, rather than inner desires. They even enjoy occasional inactivity, they like quiet time, and they don’t expect a great deal from themselves.

Operational, Strategic and Conceptual Bandwidth: People have bandwidth. Some people have operational bandwidth. Their intellectual capacity may be potentially able to handle all the information in the world, but not all at once. Someone with operational bandwidth can handle a few ideas at a time, efficiently. However, if you start presenting several different ideas at once, they get confused and frustrated. The next level is strategic bandwidth who can handle more information, but still there’s an upper limit to how much they can handle. Next, the highest level, for our purposes is conceptual bandwidth. Conceptual bandwidth would be about two percent of the population. These are people who have an enormous capacity for processing different ideas at the same time and doing so efficiently. These are people who can juggle a lot of different tasks at once, keep all the plates spinning on the poles, as they say, and keep these ideas, really, clearly in mind. They can shift from one to the other without any real confusion.
Strategic represents about eighteen percent of the population. When they look at something, they look at it not in terms of the overall concepts, they look at it strategically and they think. “How can this be used, what are some other options or alternatives?” Typically these are the people who are drawn towards sales, management or leadership positions. Not always but typically. Just learn to recognize whether the person you’re talking with is more conceptual, more strategic, or more operational.

Presentation Skills: Whether you speak well, or not, you still must give a logical flow to your ideas. In your presentation, be sure to cover five general areas - the calm, the need gap; the solution; documentation and a call to action. To be more effective in making presentations, here a few key tips. Be entertaining or interesting. Play off needs. Customize your presentation, follow a structure, only discuss the features of your product or service. Build perceived value. Differentiate yourself form your competition; create carefully worded phrases. Present simple, broad concepts first, complex detailed concepts later in the presentation. Lay the groundwork, and then get specific. Finally, don’t make it a lecture, make it a dialogue, and involve your prospect.
To find out the real reason behind resistance use the following four-step process for handling resistance:  listen carefully, don’t interrupt them, hear them out; check your understanding by giving feedback, such as “Let me see if I understood you properly, here’s what I hear you saying, is that accurate?”; addresses the issue effectively, use logic and emotion. In other words, talk about the feelings, but also talk about the logic; and confirm the acceptance of your solution. If you handled it well, it shouldn’t be an issue any longer. So ask, “Does that put your concerns to rest?”

Selling Takeaways
·         If you were to spend merely fifteen minutes each day gaining one new sales idea or sharpening a skill, within just a few years you would become an industry leader.
·         A healthy and productive relationship requires three elements: a mutual commitment to making the relationship work; open and frequent communication between the participants; and knowing what you expect from each other.
·         Not all sales can be generated by today’s activity. Some of today’s actions need to be sent ahead to prepare us for tomorrow’s sales.
·         People do business with people they like.
·         Answer phone calls in no more than four rings. If your phone traffic is too heavy to allow this, hire someone else or get some way developed to get the call answered before the fourth ring. A good receptionist is not measured by how quickly he or she handles calls, but by the positive outcome of each call.
·         Time spent on hold is often referred to as being in “voice jail,” and that’s what it feels like when you’re waiting endlessly to get your message through.
·         Measurement helps you determine what you’re doing right and what you’re not. If you don’t keep records you don’t have a clue as to how to improve.
·         The five areas for any manager to measure are sales calls, expenses incurred, non-sales activities, new market opportunities, and the results you’re getting.
·         Lifelong learning is essential in today’s world, but there must also be some lifelong “earning.”
·         When there is no graduation, there is no commencement of one’s career.
·         Sales don’t come from what you know; they come from what you do. Knowing makes you more capable but action brings results.
·         Society advances based on two things: the solutions we produce, and the connections we sustain.
·         Technology has advanced so much that our biggest problem is choosing between good alternatives, not simply identifying the bad versus the good.
·         Today we recognize that we don’t live in a mechanical world. We live in a world that is biological. Therefore, we are entering what could be called the organic era.
·         When you don’t have an edge in product or price, then you must have an edge in the way you connect with people.
·         Relationship selling is about making sales while building relationships.
·         When someone asks you a question, you should have a series of micro presentations already thought through in your mind, so that you can instantly describe, in the way you’d like to, the benefit or value that you want to convey to the customer.
·         There’s quite a difference between merely being prepared and being prepared to excel. For one, all that is expected of you is competence. For the other, you are expected to achieve excellence.
·         Each of the assets that you build eliminates a liability that could inhibit your career growth. Together these assets constitute your professional equity.
·         An opportunity is only an opportunity if you are ready for it.
·         A market is a group of people who have enough in common with each other that you can establish a reputation among them.
·         The goal of marketing is to give you a large number of people who are wiling and eager to see you.
·         The quickest way to grow your business is to ask for referrals. If you don’t ask, you don’t get.
·         We need different people in our life who do different things for us and for whom we can do different things-people who have a certain effect on us, who we are, and how we live our lives. Look at what your relationships do for you.
·         And listen better. Good listeners generate more openness than those who are just good talkers.
·         One very effective way to get your message out to the community, or your marketplace, is by giving presentations. That means speeches and public presentations, not just individual sales presentations. The reason this works so well is that you’re able to reach many more people. When you have a group of people gathered together and you’re able to present your message, you have their undivided attention. You’ve got the opportunity to dramatize your message.
·         Every person has seven natural values; sensuality, empathy, wealth, power, aesthetics, commitment and knowledge.
·         Marketing, selling and service are not the same thing. Marketing is generating a desire for your product or service. Selling is converting that desire into transactions. And service converts those transactions into satisfied clients.

The book concludes with a message from the following story: Several years ago Jim (author of this book) was walking on the beach in La Jolla, California with a colleague of him, Dr. Spencer Johnson, who wrote the book Who Moved My Cheese? and prior to that, many other books, including co-authoring The One Minute Manager with Dr. Ken Blanchard.
They sat down in front of the La Jolla Beach and Tennis Club and watched the sunset. And Spencer said to Jim, “I’ve been studying people who do what you do.”
Jim said, “You mean professional speakers?”
Spencer said, “Yes, trainers, speakers. Most of them seem to be working really, really hard but not getting as much in return for their effort as they could get. Then there’s a small group of them who seem to be getting almost everything they want, seemingly without effort.”
Jim asked, “Why do you think that is?”
“What I’ve found is that the large group, the people working hard and getting minimal results, seem to be working primarily in their head. To them, it’s all about logic, systems, linear thinking, details, specific hard plans and doing exact behaviors in an exact way. That’s useful, but that’s not what gets big successes in the long run.”
“What about the smaller group that seems to be getting everything they want and not working nearly as hard to get it? Jim asked.
He said, “Jim, those people seem to be coming primarily from their heart. They’re doing the things they love to do and they’re doing things in a way that they deeply care about and feel committed to.


What is the Recommendation?

This book contains lots of examples, illustrations, stories, case studies and quotes.  It explains listening skills, presentation skills, negotiation skills and selling skills. It is useful for any type of industry to apply to reap rewards.  This book is useful for sales and marketing professionals and also for leaders who want to improve their presentation skills, negotiation skills, listening skills and selling skills. It is a great book worth investing your time. You can gift this book to others. Enjoy reading this book!


“First say to yourself what you would be; and then do what you have to do.” – Epictetus

References
The Eight Competencies of Relationship Selling: How to Reach the Top 1% in Just 15 Extra Minutes a Day by Jim Cathcart (Leading Authorities Press; First edition, October 28, 2002)


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Professor M.S.Rao, India
Founder of MSR Leadership Consultants India
Listed in Marquis Who's Who in the World in 2013
21 Success Sutras for Leaders: Top 10 Leadership Books of the Year (San Diego University) Amazon URL: http://www.amazon.com/21-Success-Sutras-Leaders-ebook/dp/B00AK98ELI


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